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Washington Football Team
Washington helmet.png Washington FT logo.svg
Helmet Logo
Information
League NFL.gif National Football League
Conference NFC.png NFC
Division NFC East
Established 1932
Home field FedExField
City Landover, Maryland
Uniforms
Washington color uniform.png Washington white uniform.png Washington alternate uniform.png
Color White Alternate
Home Field
WashingtonHomefield.png
Championships
League
5
1937 • 1942 • 1982
1987 • 1991
Super Bowls
Lombardi Trophy logo gray.jpg 3
XVII • XXII • XXVI
Conference
Conference Championship logo2.jpg 5
1972 • 1982 • 1983
1987 • 1991
Division
15
1936 • 1937 • 1940
1942 • 1943 • 1945
1972 • 1983 • 1984
1987 • 1991 • 1999
2012 • 2015 • 2020

The Washington Football Team are a professional football team based in the Washington, D.C. area. They are currently members of the Eastern Division of the National Football Conference (NFC) in the National Football League (NFL). The team plays at FedEx Field in Landover, Maryland. The team's headquarters and training facility are at Redskin Park in Ashburn, Virginia.

Washington has played over one thousand games since 1932. In those games, they have won five professional American football championships including two NFL Championships and three Super Bowls. They have captured ten NFL divisional titles and six NFL conference championships.

Washington won the 1937 and 1942 Championship games, as well as Super Bowls XVII, XXII, and XXVI. They also played in and lost the 1936, 1940, 1943, and 1945 Championship games, as well as Super Bowls VII and XVIII. They have made twenty-four postseason appearances, and have an overall postseason record of 23 wins and 18 losses.

All of their league titles were attained during two ten-year spans. From 1936 to 1945, Washington went to the NFL Championship game six times, winning two of them. The second period lasted between 1982 and 1991 where they appeared in the postseason seven times, captured four Conference titles, and won three Super Bowls out of four appearances. They have also experienced failure in their history. The most notable period of failure was from 1946 to 1970, during which they did not have a single postseason appearance. During this period, they went without a single winning season between 1956 and 1968. In 1961, the franchise posted their worst regular season record with a 1–12–1 showing.

According to Forbes Magazine, Washington is the second most valuable franchise in the NFL, behind the Dallas Cowboys, and were valued at approximately $1.55 billion as of 2009. Being the second most valuable franchise, they remain the highest grossing team in the NFL with $345 million in revenue during the 2009 season. They have also broken the NFL's mark for single-season attendance eight years in a row.

The name and logo have caused controversy over the years, especially among Native American groups. In 2020, in the wake of sweeping name changes and nationwide protests after the death of George Floyd, it was announced that the Redskins name and logo would be retired. Washington later announced that it would temporarily play its 2020 and 2021 season under the Washington Football Team name until they could secure a trademark for a new permanent name and logo. They will establish the new name and logo for the 2022 season.

NFL.gif Team history[]

Membership[]

League affiliations
NFL.gif National Football League (1932-present)
  • Eastern Division (1933-1949)
  • American Conference (1950-1952)
  • Eastern Conference (1953-1969)
    • NFL Capitol (1967–1969)
  • NFC.png National Football Conference (1970-present)

Championships[]

Super Bowl XVII[]

Super Bowl XVII
Super Bowl XVII.svg January 30, 1983
Rose Bowl
Pasadena, California
Dolphins helmet.png Miami Dolphins 17
Redskins helmet.png Double arrow icon.png Washington Redskins 27
MVP: John Riggins (FB)

Behind their offensive line "The Hogs", fullback John Riggins (who had sat out the 1980 season), and kicker Mark Moseley (who was named NFL MVP, the only special teamer to ever do so), the Redskins went a league-best 8-1 in a strike-shortened season (every team made the playoffs), then defeated the Detroit Lions 31-7 in the wild-card round, defeated the Minnesota Vikings 21-7 in the divisional round, then defeated the Dallas Cowboys in the NFC Championship game (avenging their only loss) 31-17 to reach Super Bowl XVII.

The game was a rematch of Super Bowl VII, which was played in the same arena and won by the Dolphins to complete their perfect season. Despite dominating the game, the Redskins trailed 17-13 in the fourth quarter because of two long Miami touchdowns (a 76-yard pass and a 98-yard kickoff return). The deficit would have been worse if Joe Theismann had not alertly deflected a potential end zone interception by Kim Bokamper (who had deflected the pass). On the drive after the deflection, the Redskins drove to the Miami 43 and faced a 4th and 1. The Redskins called I-Right 70 Chip, and Riggins got the first down, ran over cornerback Don McNeal, and outraced the Miami defense for a touchdown. The Redskins clinched the game on a touchdown pass from Theismann to Charley Brown. Riggins was named Super Bowl MVP after 38 carries (still the record for a Super Bowl) for a record 166 yards and the touchdown. Riggins also caught a 15-yard pass giving him more total yards than the Dolphins.

Super Bowl XXII[]

Super Bowl XXII
Super Bowl XXII.svg January 31, 1988
Jack Murphy Stadium
San Diego, California
Redskins helmet.png Double arrow icon.png Washington Redskins 42
Broncos helmet.png Denver Broncos 10
MVP: Doug Williams (QB)

In a season shortened to 15 games by a players strike and where replacement players played 3 games, the Redskins went 11-4 including a 3-0 record by the replacements, then upset the Chicago Bears 21-17 in the divisional round, then beat the upstart Minnesota Vikings in the NFC Championship game 17-10 to reach Super Bowl XXII.

The storyline was focused on Redskins quarterback Doug Williams who had not been named the starter over Jay Schroeder until the final week of the season and was also the first African-American quarterback to start a Super Bowl. The Redskins fell behind 10-0 in the first quarter and Williams twisted his leg and sat out the rest of the quarter. However Williams reentered at the start of the second quarter and led the Redskins to 35 points in the quarter. Williams threw 4 touchdown passes while rookie Timmy Smith ran for the other and added another in the second half. Williams was named Super Bowl MVP after completing 18 of 29 passes for a record 340 yards and a record 4 touchdowns, becoming the first African-American quarterback to win a Super Bowl. Rickey Sanders caught 9 passes for a record 193 yards and 2 touchdowns (tying the record held by Max McGee, John Stallworth, and Cliff Branch). Both yardage records would be broken in the next Super Bowl. Smith ran for a record 204 yards and two touchdowns on 22 carries.

The efforts of the Redskins replacement players (mainly their Monday Night Football victory over the Dallas Cowboys who had most of their regulars cross the picket line) inspired the 2000 movie The Replacements starring Gene Hackman, Keanu Reeves, Jon Favreau, Orlando Jones, Rhys Ifans, and Jack Warden.

Super Bowl XXVI[]

Super Bowl XXVI
Super Bowl XXVI.svg January 26, 1992
Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome
Minneapolis, Minnesota
Redskins helmet.png Double arrow icon.png Washington Redskins 37
Bills helmet2.png Buffalo Bills 24
MVP: Mark Rypien (QB)

Behind The Hogs, the Redskins went a league best 14-2, then beat the Atlanta Falcons 24-7 in the divisional round, then blew out the Detroit Lions 41-10 in the NFC Championship game to reach Super Bowl XXVI.

After a scoreless first quarter, the Redskins jumped out to a 24-0 lead before the Bills finally scored. Mark Rypien was named Super Bowl MVP after completing 18 of 33 passes for 292 yards and 2 touchdowns while Gerald Riggs ran for two short touchdowns. With the win, the Redskins became the first team to win the Super Bowl with 3 different quarterbacks.

Achievements[]

Achievements
AP Most Valuable Player Offensive Player of the Year Defensive Player of the Year Super Bowl MVP
1972 Redskins helmet.png Larry Brown 1972 Redskins helmet.png Larry Brown 1982 Riggins2.png John Riggins
1982 Moseley2.png Mark Moseley 1983 Theismann2.png Joe Theismann 1987 DWilliams2.png Doug Williams
1983 Theismann2.png Joe Theismann 1991 Rypien2.png Mark Rypien

Packers.png Rivalry[]

Redskins.png
Packers.png
Washington Redskins vs. Green Bay Packers
Packers lead series 19–14–1
Season Date Winning team Score Stadium Series Box
Boston Braves join the National Football League in 1932.
1932 Nov. 13 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 21–0 Braves Field 1–0 Football icon.png
Boston Braves are renamed before the 1933 season to the Boston Redskins.
1933 Sep. 17 Tie T 7–7 City Stadium 1–0–1 Football icon.png
Nov. 19 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 7–20 Fenway Park 1–1–1 Football icon.png
1934 Nov. 4 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 10–0 Fenway Park 2–1–1 Football icon.png
1936 Oct. 11 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 31–2 City Stadium 3–1–1 Football icon.png
Nov. 8 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 7–3 Fenway Park 4–1–1 Football icon.png
NFL.gif Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 21–6 Polo Grounds (New York) 5–1–1 Football icon.png
Boston Redskins move before the 1937 season, renamed the Washington Redskins.
1937 Nov. 28 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 6–14 Griffith Stadium 6–2–1 Football icon.png
1939 Oct. 29 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 24–14 Wisconsin State Fair Park 7–2–1 Football icon.png
1941 Nov. 30 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 22–17 Griffith Stadium 8–2–1 Football icon.png
1943 Oct. 17 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 7–33 Wisconsin State Fair Park 8–3–1 Football icon.png
1946 Dec. 1 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 20–7 Griffith Stadium 9–3–1 Football icon.png
1947 Oct. 19 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 27–10 Wisconsin State Fair Park 10–3–1 Football icon.png
1948 Oct. 24 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 7–23 Wisconsin State Fair Park 10–4–1 Football icon.png
1949 Dec. 4 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 0–30 Griffith Stadium 10–5–1 Football icon.png
1950 Sep. 24 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 35–21 Wisconsin State Fair Park 11–5–1 Football icon.png
1952 Oct. 5 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 35–20 Marquette Stadium (Milwaukee) 12–5–1 Football icon.png
1958 Oct. 19 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 21–37 Griffith Stadium 12–6–1 Football icon.png
1959 Nov. 22 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 21–0 New City Stadium 13–6–1 Football icon.png
1968 Nov. 24 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 27–7 D.C. Stadium 13–6–1 Football icon.png
1972 Nov. 26 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 16–21 RFK Stadium 13–7–1 Football icon.png
NFL Divisional.jpg Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 3–16 RFK Stadium 13–8–1 Football icon.png
1974 Nov. 3 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 6–17 Lambeau Field 13–9–1 Football icon.png
1977 Dec. 2 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 9–10 RFK Stadium 13–10–1 Football icon.png
1979 Dec. 2 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 21–38 RFK Stadium 13–11–1 Football icon.png
1983 Oct. 17 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 48–47 Lambeau Field 14–11–1 Football icon.png
1986 Nov. 9 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 7–16 Lambeau Field 14–12–1 Football icon.png
1988 Oct. 23 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 17–20 Milwaukee County Stadium 14–13–1 Football icon.png
2001 Sep. 24 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 37–0 Lambeau Field 15–13–1 Football icon.png
2002 Oct. 20 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 30–9 Lambeau Field 16–13–1 Football icon.png
2004 Oct. 31 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 28–14 FedExField 17–13–1 Football icon.png
2007 Oct. 14 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 17–14 Lambeau Field 18–13–1 Football icon.png
2010 Oct. 10 Redskins helmet.png Washington Redskins L 13–16 (OT) FedExField 18–14–1 Football icon.png
2013 Sep. 15 Packers helmet.png Green Bay Packers W 38–20 Lambeau Field 19–14–1 Football icon.png

External links[]

References

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